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« Tissue Wrapping | Main | Victorian in San Francisco SOLD »
Wednesday
Dec202006

Maple Leaf in a Bottle SOLD

6 x 6, oil on panel
New Brushes
I had a great time playing with my new round brushes, I got a much more expressive stroke even with fine detail, and I was able to keep layering without carving away earlier colors. I think you can see the looser brushstrokes if you click for the larger picture. Why didn't I try rounds before?

I used only size 1 and 2 rounds for this painting and didn't fall back on my comfortable filberts, even though it takes longer to spread paint around the larger areas with the rounds. I'm glad I did, I like the effect.

New Colors
I'm really loving the cad red med (PR108) for it's saturation and transparency, no chalkiness when mixed with dark colors, and has a lovely stain when mixed with lighter colors (aka yellows). But I went back to my normal cad yellow medium (PY35), the new cad yellow light (PY154) I find frustratingly weak, although maybe it will be good for very subtle tinting like warm highlights. I like the new quinacridone rose too, but am finding I prefer my old permanent violet medium if I had to choose just one cool red/magenta.

Oh no.... strangely, both my cool reds have the exact same pigment code (PV19) marked on the back of the tube, and both tubes are Rembrandt brand, and yet Perm. Violet Medium is a dark cool purple and Quin. Rose is a brighter cool red. I really don't understand that. Something in the paint besides pigment is defining the color? This color thing is complicated.

New Lamp
I painted in daylight today, but photographed the work with the new lamp as the only lightsource and wow, I am really impressed with the color. I used a daylight white balance setting on the camera and then didn't have to do any color correcting at all once I got the digital image into Photoshop, the colors were right on. Also the sheer top-down angle really reduced the glare factor. So I can shoot right on my painting easel and dismantle my "photo-studio area". So that's made this lamp worth it's $88 price tag right there.

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Reader Comments (1)

I love all the paintings of that little bottle!... I just realized I haven't been getting my daily email, no idea why -- I'll check my spam filter. The mandarins in a bowl turned out to be stunning, and it's so fascinating watching the changes you made -- no question that the painting looks better afterwards, but I would love to be able to understand how you knew what needed to happen (repainting the table and the wall, eliminating the little curl to the right, etc.)

December 20, 2006 | Unregistered Commentershifra
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